In this week’s roundup:  

Yeesh, it was something, wasn’t it? The Capitol riots occured on December 37, 2020, some states began vaccinating non-healthcare workers and the “Fauci effect” may have something to do with the growing demand for health/medical education. 

Stay tuned next week as we hold our breath that 2021 merely saw its shadow and is now stepping out into the sun for real.

We are pleased to introduce our newest blog feature, The Roundup: HBCU Edition. 

This news roundup will focus on the trends impacting Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and other Minority Serving Institutions (MSI). Each month, we will highlight the policy, process, and programmatic changes happening nationally and among these institutions and how the colleges and universities are responding to them.

We will publish each roundup on the second Tuesday of each month. For our first issue, we will share a few major highlights from 2020 in our year-in-review. After all, one columnist at Forbes called it “the year of the HBCU” and detailed four reasons why 2020 was a banner year for HBCUs. Starting in February, we will showcase the biggest news stories and trends from the previous month, as well as some thoughts about what to expect in the coming weeks.

In this week’s roundup:  

We’ll get you caught up on all the higher education news that happened over the holiday break, plus the latest as colleges prepare for the latest semester. 

Stay tuned for our weekly roundup on what trends we’re seeing across institutions, how individual colleges and universities are responding to them and what national policy changes are affecting higher ed.

In this week’s roundup:  

New projections on college admissions’ “demographic cliff,” colleges prepare for the coming coronavirus vaccine, and athletes at HBCUs file a class-action discrimination lawsuit against the NCAA. 

As 2020 mercifully winds to a close, we’re taking a break over the next two weeks to enjoy the holidays. Our next weekly higher ed news update will be posted on January 6. 

In this week’s roundup:  

DACA starts accepting first-time applications following a court order, student loan relief is extended for millions of borrowers, and colleges and universities reflect on the lessons from the fall semester.

In this week’s roundup:  

College sports continue to be hit hard by the pandemic physically and financially, law and medical schools see an overall increase in applications and colleges and universities strategize for their spring semesters. 

In this week’s roundup:  

Many students head home for Thanksgiving, facial recognition on campus stirs controversy and international students want to return to China to complete their studies. 

In this week’s roundup:  

Campus officials and students consider the implications of heading home for the holidays, college leaders form an alliance to address racial diversity, equity and inclusion and the men’s basketball March Madness tournament will likely take place in one location to curb the spread of COVID-19.  

In this week’s roundup:  

Election aftermath continues to shape college and university campuses, attention turns to plans for the spring and college application numbers are down at some institutions in the wake of the pandemic. 

Pittsburgh

(724) 260-0198
6000 Waterdam Plaza Dr.
Suite 140
McMurray, PA 15317

Los Angeles

(323) 999-5201
1276 East Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91106

New Hampshire

(603) 756-4111
372 West St.
Suite 201B
Keene, NH 03431

Nashville

(615) 994-9900
625 Main St.
Suite 202
Nashville, TN 37206